USE OF SUSTAINABLE RESOURCES AS A MEANS TO PROMOTE BETTER ECOLOGICAL AWARENESS

OUR CORPORATE COMMITMENT TO PROMOTE THE USE OF SUSTAINABLE AND RENEWABLE RESOURCE MATERIALS FOR WOOD AND FIBERS IN OUR MANUFACTURING OPERATIONS STARTED OVER 10 YEARS AGO. SINCE THE MID - 90'S, OUR COMPANY HAS BEEN MAKING USE OF FAST GROWING, READILY AVAILABLE, FARMABLE TREES WHICH ARE COMMONLY USED BY REFORESTATION EFFORTS AND GROWN BY LARGE FORESTRY PLANTATIONS WORLDWIDE.

BAMBOO »

Bamboo is not a tree it's a grass, and it grows like one. Most species can grow two feet or more a day, and when it's harvested, it need not be replanted, because it will grow a new shoot from its extensive root system. Bamboo renews itself readily, unlike hardwood trees, which, once cut, are gone forever, making it an endlessly renewable resource. Bamboo can withstand a great deal of use without damage. It's stronger even than Oak, considered the most durable hardwood. When laminated, bamboo is nearly as strong as soft steel. It doesn't swell or shrink as hardwoods do, making it ideal for furniture and floors. More importantly, recent studies show that bamboo absorbs 50% more CO2 (Carbon Dioxide) from the environment compared to any another plant or tree, making it relatively the most ecologically sound resource.

PALM »

Coconut Palm is the best known of more than the 1,500 species in the Palm family of plants (Pal- maceae). It is a unique tree, with no really close relatives and is considered to be one of the most useful trees in the world. Grown primarily by developing nations, the annual worldwide production is staggering with an estimated 9 million acres of planted area worldwide. Only in very recent years have people begun to explore the potential commercial uses for this vast, alternative supply of wood. This led to the commercial launch of Palmwood in a range of different products, from flooring to posts to furniture. With these products performing at equal to or even better than conventional hardwoods, Palmwood represents a viable substitute for endangered hardwoods from an ecologically sound source.

GEMELINA »

Gemelina or Gmelina, better known by its botanical name Gmelina arborea, is a fast growing tree grows in typically moist fertile valleys with 750-4500 mm rainfall, making India and the rest of Southeast Asia as an ideal ecological breeding ground. G. arborea wood is pale yellow to cream coloured when fresh, turning yellowish brown on exposure. Its grains are usually straight to irregular or rarely wavy, and medium-course textured. G. arborea wood can be easily stained and retains colours well. Sometimes referred to as White Teak, its lustrous surface absorbs stains and colors well, is lightweight yet at the same time stable and durable, making it highly esteemed for doors and window panels, joinery and furnitures (especially drawers, wardrobes and cupboards), and musical instruments.

PINE »

Pinus radiata (from the family Pinaceae) is known in English as Monterey Pine in British Europe and Northern Americas, and Radiata Pine in Australia, New Zealand and Chile. It is a fast growing tree, adaptable to a broad range of soil types and climates, and has the ability to grow to a large diameter faster than almost any other tree species making it ideal for forestry, and reforestation efforts. Extremely versatile, the Radiata Pine wood can be used for both exterior and interior applications including domestic and commercial construction, furniture, panels (such as veneer, plywood, particle board, and fiber board), even landscaping and pulp and paper. For interior uses the wood is kiln dried, while for exterior use, the wood is treated with preservatives.